Daoism and Chinese Culture

Daoism and Chinese Culture

Daoism and Chinese Culture A long awaited textbook that introduces the major schools teachings and practices of Daoism this work presents a chronological survey that is thematically divided into four parts Ancient Thought R

  • Title: Daoism and Chinese Culture
  • Author: Livia Kohn
  • ISBN: 9781931483001
  • Page: 499
  • Format: Paperback
  • A long awaited textbook that introduces the major schools, teachings, and practices of Daoism, this work presents a chronological survey that is thematically divided into four parts Ancient Thought, Religious Communities, Spiritual Practices, and Modernity.The work offers an integrated vision of the Daoist tradition in its historical and cultural context, establishing conA long awaited textbook that introduces the major schools, teachings, and practices of Daoism, this work presents a chronological survey that is thematically divided into four parts Ancient Thought, Religious Communities, Spiritual Practices, and Modernity.The work offers an integrated vision of the Daoist tradition in its historical and cultural context, establishing connections with relevant information on Confucianism, Chinese Buddhism, popular religion, and political developments.It also places Daoism into a larger theoretical and comparative framework, relating it to mysticism, millenarianism, forms of religious organization, ritual, meditation, and modernity The book makes ample use of original materials and provides references to further readings and original sources in translation It is a powerful resource for teaching and studying alike.

    • Best Read [Livia Kohn] ☆ Daoism and Chinese Culture || [Contemporary Book] PDF Ð
      499 Livia Kohn
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Livia Kohn] ☆ Daoism and Chinese Culture || [Contemporary Book] PDF Ð
      Posted by:Livia Kohn
      Published :2019-06-07T22:40:27+00:00

    208 Comment

    Although certainly not a studied person in Daoism, I cannot imagine a more well presented survey of its thought and its changing forms than this book. To be clear, I found the material pretty difficult. Take the following extract from the second chapter of the Zhuangzi:Joy and anger, sadness and delight, worry and regret, fickleness and stiffness, fascination and idleness, imperiousness and consideration – they arise in us like music from hollows sor fungi from dampness [out of nowhere]. Day a [...]

    The author sure seems to know a lot about Daoism.This is a straightforward book, if, that is, anything relating to Daoism can be labeled 'straightforward.' I think I understood the book when I was reading it, but about ten minutes after the fact, if you had asked me to explain what I had just read, I wouldn't have been able to tell you anything. Maybe I'm too old and the topic is simply too foreign for me to really grasp, but, hey, I try. As with studying any philosophy or religion, it would pro [...]

    An extremely thorough examination of religious, political, and "popular" Daoism, but barely goes into the philosophy at all. I mean, thats the point. Its a book about Daoism and Chinese culture, not a book of paradoxes and weird poems about water. It has a lot of information, but the narrative it ties them into is thinner than the data. The result is something which read very much like an encyclopedia. Its useful as a reference, and you'll remember more of it if you already have some familiarity [...]

    Kohn writes the clearest treatise on Taoism's complex history that I have read so far. It is hagiographic, historical, and precise. I would hazard to say that it is not the best introduction to the topic, but it helped me clear up a lot of confusion over different types of praxis and the complex relationship between the different schools.

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